Umm....

The world is pretty cool, most of the time...

398 notes

thefluffingtonpost:

Cat Spends Hours Stalking Toy Mouse
Damocles the cat was concerned when he came downstairs to his favorite chair in the living room (he likes to sit under it, not on it) and noticed an intruder in his kingdom. There, in the middle of the room, was a small, grey mouse. That infraction would not stand.
According to eye witnesses, Damocles spent the next three days strategizing and laying the foundation for an attack. The mouse stood its ground. 
And 0700 local time, the cat launched his offensive. The battle lasted just four seconds and it was only then that Damocles realized the truth about his foe: the mouse was made of crocheted yarn.
"I’m not going to lie: he was a little bummed at first," said spokesperson Trey Winterstone. "But the important thing is that the living room is safe again. We can’t lose sight of that."
Via kait_katbar. 

thefluffingtonpost:

Cat Spends Hours Stalking Toy Mouse

Damocles the cat was concerned when he came downstairs to his favorite chair in the living room (he likes to sit under it, not on it) and noticed an intruder in his kingdom. There, in the middle of the room, was a small, grey mouse. That infraction would not stand.

According to eye witnesses, Damocles spent the next three days strategizing and laying the foundation for an attack. The mouse stood its ground. 

And 0700 local time, the cat launched his offensive. The battle lasted just four seconds and it was only then that Damocles realized the truth about his foe: the mouse was made of crocheted yarn.

"I’m not going to lie: he was a little bummed at first," said spokesperson Trey Winterstone. "But the important thing is that the living room is safe again. We can’t lose sight of that."

Via kait_katbar

Filed under omg cute

484 notes

newyorker:

David Denby on Stanley Kubrick’s satirical masterpiece “Dr. Strangelove,” which is now a half century old: http://nyr.kr/T3aLTw

“Why should a popular artist have any obligation to propose ‘sane’ solutions to an intolerable situation? Surely it’s enough to expose with overwhelming comic energy the contradictions and paradoxes of ‘mutual assured destruction.’ Sane actions are the business of scientists, the military, and Presidents, a few of whom may have been roused to act by this movie.”


Replace the word “artist” with the word “activist”

newyorker:

David Denby on Stanley Kubrick’s satirical masterpiece “Dr. Strangelove,” which is now a half century old: http://nyr.kr/T3aLTw

“Why should a popular artist have any obligation to propose ‘sane’ solutions to an intolerable situation? Surely it’s enough to expose with overwhelming comic energy the contradictions and paradoxes of ‘mutual assured destruction.’ Sane actions are the business of scientists, the military, and Presidents, a few of whom may have been roused to act by this movie.”

Replace the word “artist” with the word “activist”

(Source: newyorker.com)

Filed under you don't need a solution to criticize the status quo not that I'm really an activist but that argument is annoying as fuck

646 notes

The Origins of “Privilege”

newyorker:

An interview with the woman who popularized the term “white privilege”:

Other people had been writing about privilege before you—why did your paper attract so much attention?

I think it was because nobody else was writing so personally, and giving such clear examples, drawn from personal…

(Source: newyorker.com)

19,293 notes

“If you really believe that representation doesn’t matter, then why the fuck are you threatened by it? If not seeing yourself depicted in stories has no negative psychological impact - if the breakdown of who we see on screen has no bearing on wider social issues - then what would it matter if nine stories out of ten were suddenly all about queer brown women? No big, right? It wouldn’t change anything important; just a few superficial details. Because YOU can identify with ANYONE.

So I guess the problem is that you just don’t want to. Because deep down, you think it’ll make stories worse. And why is that? Oh, yeah: because it means they wouldn’t all be about YOU.”

fozmeadows (via kawaii-afro-fluff)

because it would threaten your white superiority

but whites want to act like they’re ignorance and racism is a sign of them being more intellectual

(via blackfeminism)

(via bitterandcurt)

1,136 notes

chibiusaidwhat asked: so what's the appropriate terms to use instead of 'oriental'? and why is 'oriental' considered as racist and offensive? I thought it was a common term since it's widely used

thisisnotjapan:

From Ellen Oh- 

Please don’t call me Oriental

The other day an old man made a comment to me that my oriental children were well mannered. I said thank you and tried not to let the oriental comment bother me. After all, he is from a different generation where oriental was the correct term to use for Asians. But it got me to thinking about the word and why it bothered me and I started doing some research and stumbled upon a forum with over 10 pages of back and forth on why it was insulting or why it was ridiculous. And the one comment that really upset me was when someone said “Oriental offensive? Since when did we let foreigners dictate how to use our language?”

It is a telling comment. Its roots based in the notion that Asians are foreigners. The term “oriental” comes from the “orient” which refers to the east. A term that was based on the Eurocentric belief that the Orient was a barbaric and exotic place east of Europe. It is why the word itself is considered derogatory, for it casts “orientals” as different, as foreigners. And when you think of yourself as American, being reminded that you are “foreign” hurts.

When I first started having conversations about race with my children, they would ask me if they should tell people they are Korean. I said no, you say you are American. “But I can’t say that,” my then 6 year old said. “They say I don’t look American.” I think as a parent, there are moments that just break your heart because you want to protect your children from the harsh realities of life and you find that you just can’t.

The reality is that my kids, me, my sister, my husband - we are as far from being Korean as we are from being Egyptian or Russian. We might look like a Korean and pass for one on the streets of Seoul, but as soon as we open our mouths, our Americanism pours right out. Not just in what we say or how we say it. But in how we think, walk, laugh, carry ourselves, etc. For someone to say “You’re not American because you don’t look like one.” Well then, you might as well strip us of our complete identity. It’s like every time someone shouts out “Go back to your own country!” Something inside of us dies just a little bit.

This past spring, youngest came home from kindergarten deeply upset. When I asked her what was wrong, she explained that she was sitting at lunch with 2 of her friends H and M, who are both blond and blue-eyed. Two boys were sitting across from them and were commenting on how pretty H and M are, listing how pretty their eyes were and their long hair, etc. They then turned to youngest and began to comment on how ugly she was in comparison. Youngest was devastated. I was proud of her for standing up to them. Telling them to stop or she would move to another table. When they didn’t stop, she made good on her threat and moved away. I was proud of her for taking a stand, but my heart broke for her. She asked me if she really was ugly because she didn’t have blonde hair and blue eyes. “No,” I said, “you are beautiful inside and out but some people just are blind and can’t see a diamond shining so bright in front of them. But that’s ok. It’s their loss so don’t even waste your time thinking about them.”

Even in kindergarten, children learn to recognize differences and to comment on them. While I did call the school and had the teacher have the boys apologize to youngest, can we really blame children for deep rooted societal prejudices? They told youngest she was ugly because she was different. Her eyes were different, her cheeks were different, even the one asymmetric dimple she has was different. I told her different is good. I hope she remembers that and never lets this become insecurity.

Many people complain that we’ve become so PC that we can’t say anything for fear of someone getting offended. To some extent, I agree with that and I don’t ask for people to be so careful with their words. But ultimately it isn’t the words that hurt but the intent behind them and sometimes the words themselves become synonymous with the intent. Calling someone oriental or making chinky eyes might not have been made with a racist intent, but the word and the action have become synonymous with an intent to be racist. So why use them? Yes we are different and I truly believe different is good. But when these differences are used as a way to stereotype people negatively, it becomes racism.

So please, don’t call me oriental. I am no devious, slant-eyed, exotic foreigner that speaks cryptically of ancient Chinese secrets. That stereotype needs to die. Help me kill it once and for all.

11 notes

Punching in a Dream

obsidian-magazine:

For this assignment, I was told to write what I know. I tried hard, at first, to come up with characters and settings that matched the people and places I grew up around, issues that reflected the realities of being black, with all its intersections, in America. This is what I thought I knew, what I was supposed to know. But I realized that I don’t know these things well at all, that I am still in the process of learning them. So instead, I wrote about the things I did know intimately that I thought had nothing to do with race: school, coffee, late nights, dreams, boys who could not love you back and the feeling of becoming a ghost. In the end, I think these things say more about my experience with blackness than writing a story explicitly about race ever would have.

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